Sunday, August 15, 2010

Market Day Canelé de Bordeaux






The canelé is a magical bakery confection, a cake with a rich custardy interior enclosed by a thin caramelized shell. It's a brilliant construction developed long ago by an anonymous Bordeaux cook, whose innovation has been subjected to 300 years of refinements.

Many recipes don't carry a tale, the canelé carries many. One of the oldest refers to a convent in Bordeaux, where, before the French Revolution, the nuns prepared cakes called canalize made with donated egg yolks from local winemakers, who used only the whites to clarify their wines. Any records that might verify this were lost in the turbulent revolution, thus relegating the convent story to legend.

In an alternative tale resident of Bordeaux, who lived along the docks, gleaned spilled low-protein flour from the loading areas, and then used it to make sweets for poor children. The small canelé molds, fluted and made of copper or brass, were nestled in embers to be baked. from Paula Wolfert

Market Day Canelé are made in Philadelphia, the ingredients are: fresh whole (natural) milk & pasture eggs, sugar, flour, rum, butter, Tahitian vanilla and orange zest*. These ingredients are baked in molds brushed with a bit of organic beeswax to crisp the exterior and to allow the canelé to slip from its mold.

* The ultra orthodox Confrerie of Canelé de Bordeaux considers orange flavoring a “bastardization.”

The 2.8oz canelé contains about 165 calories:

  • Total Fat: 6.0 g
  • Cholesterol: 69.9 mg
  • Sodium: 70.3 mg
  • Total Carbs: 23.2 g
  • Dietary Fiber: 0.2 g
  • Protein: 4.1 g

Gaetano@MarketDayCanele.com

8 comments:

Man-Woman said...

Hi Gaetano,
reading your blog we wondered what the fuss about Caneles was... well, we tried one, though unfortunatly not one of yours - what fools we were! Caneles are simply amazing. So we feel we owe you, and in a few days we'll make it up to you ;)

Gaetano said...

Thanks for your message. Canelé are special and I'm thrilled that you you too agree.

Intrigued by your cryptic promise.

Man-Woman said...

all is revealed ;)

uhockey said...

Thanks for stopping by the blog - truly excellent canelle. :) I only wish they weren't so time consuming for the home chef to perfect. FYI - yours blew Garces Trading Co out of the water.

http://uhockey.blogspot.com

Gaetano said...

On your next visit to Philly give a heads up. I'd like to hand off some canele and other tasty Philly recommendations.

Thanks your compliments.

Anonymous said...

Gaetano,

I am really disappointed to see that someone who strives to make something so lovely would be so demeaning to others trying to do the same thing. Seeing your posts on Chez Pim made me never want to support you or your business.

http://chezpim.com/bake/canele-recipe-method#disqus_thread

Gaetano said...

"never" Anon?

Never is a very long time! (without an excellent canele)

Definition of "demeaning": causing awareness of your shortcomings; "baking canele is a humbling experience"

My posts on her blog are a legit critique. They are not personal and they point out errors and misconceptions. Acquiring culinary expertise is a learning process. Learning requires being receptive to feedback and criticism. Without it you might imagine every thing you do is fantastic.


http://phillymarketcafe.blogspot.com/2011/02/chez-pim-ponce-of-canele.html

uhockey@yahoo.com said...

Hello Gaetano,

You asked me to message you if I'm ever due back in Philly. I'll be in town from 5/22-5/27 and would gladly get together for some Canele or other baked goods talk. Feel free to e-mail me or stop by the renamed blog. uhockey@yahoo.com or http://endoedibles.com